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We hope to support students interested in HBCU's by exposing them to HBCU Alumni and current students experiences. We also hope to provide students with more information on HBCU's. 

What is an HBCU?

HBCU stands for Historically Black Colleges and Universities

"HBCUs date back to the 19th century, when many offered Black students an opportunity for higher education. Today, HBCUs continue to serve a vital role in higher education."

"HBCU's were founded on the belief that every individual deserves access to a college or higher education. More specifically, the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended defines an HBCU as “any historically Black college or university that was established prior to 1964, whose principal mission was, and is, the education of Black Americans, and that is accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or association determined by the Secretary of Education.”' 

(Source: HBCU Lifestyle, https://hbculifestyle.com/hbcus-101-getting-started/, https://www.affordablecollegesonline.org/college-resource-center/hbcu-history-and-modern-importance/)

Why are HBCU's important? How do they differ from regular universities and colleges?

"HBCUs enroll low-income, first-generation and academically underprepared college students –precisely the students that the country most needs to obtain college degrees.  More than 75% of students at HBCUs rely on Pell Grants and nearly 13% rely on PLUS Loans to meet their college expenses.  HBCUs have 1/8 of the average size of endowments than historically white colleges and universities. Against these odds, HBCUs historically have provided an affordable education to millions of students of color, graduating the majority of America’s African American teachers, doctors, judges, engineers, and other scientific and technological professionals."

(Source: https://www.tmcf.org/about-us/member-schools/about-hbcus/)

How many HBCU's are there?

Where are HBCU's located?

Black Out Coalition offers a virtual HBCU map that locates all of the HBCU colleges/universities. Please click on the picture to visit the map. (Black Out Coalition, https://blackoutcoalition.org/hbcu-map/) 

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Teisha Bradley

Introduce yourself and the HBCU you attended!

My name is Teisha Bradley I am currently pursuing my Master's at RISD. I am 26 years old and I am a first-gen graduate born and raised in Washington DC I attended Morgan State Univesity  2014-2018 received a Bachelor of Science in Architectural Design and Urban Studies. 

How did attending an HBCU impact you academically and/or personally?

I studied architecture and that particular depart was traumatic. I felt extremely unsupported and gain multiple insecurities about myself as an architect. Personally, the education I received outside of my department changed my perspective on design and strengthen my understanding of the African Diaspora. 

What were some of your favorite memories of attending your HBCU?

The Bear Dean, which is a carryout located in the upperclassman housing call Morgan View. The food was amazing. Also working off of campus at Cosima located in Down Town Baltimore. 

 

Artscape is another highlight, it’s a festival for artists and every year our department would create insulation for the show.

 

Travel abroad trip to china all-expense-paid except for flight 

 

Homecoming week and I love Morgan week. You get free stuff!!!

What is any advice you would give to current students interested in attending an HBCU?

Join organizations participate in lecture, career-building programs always visit financial aid early before noon. Be prepared when you go to financial aid and be confident in what you need help with. Visit the study abroad department you never know what free trips they have.

Jackey Robinson

Introduce yourself and the HBCU you attended!

Hi I am Jackey Robinson and I am an architect, artist and designer.  I attended the illustrious Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland, receiving a Bachelors of Science - Architecture in 2018. I am currently a second year graduate student at Rhode Island School of Design. I am a taurus. I love the performing arts. 

How did attending an HBCU impact you academically and/or personally?

Studying architecture at an HBCU felt very isolated because we were the "weirdos" of the campus that was full of Liberal Art departments. Personally, it was an amazing experience, learning about Black culture, creativity, and more. Being around young Black thriving individuals as a Black person, creates confidence. I've created lifetime friends from my University. 

What were some of your favorite memories of attending your HBCU?

Homecoming, D-9 Step shows/ probates, Fried Chicken Wednesday, Fried Fish Fridays, I love Morgan Week, & Morgan's SAP  department participating in Baltimore annual Artscape every summer.

What is any advice you would give to current students interested in attending an HBCU?

Join organizations participate in lecture, career-building programs always visit financial aid early before noon. Be prepared when you go to financial aid and be confident in what you need help with. Visit the study abroad department you never know what free trips they have.

Jaliyah Spann

Introduce yourself and the HBCU you attended!

Hello! My name is Jaliyah Spann, I am a first-year medical student at Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine. I am also a proud alumna of the number #1 HBCU in the country, Spelman College.

How did attending an HBCU impact you academically and/or personally?

Attending an HBCU taught me the importance of being the conductor of my own life. Before coming to Spelman, I knew that I was intelligent but unsure of how I would match up with every other intelligent Black woman from all the other states. Quickly, I learned that while I was intelligent, the standard that Spelman has for excellence would require me to do something I hadn’t before, seek out academic help. It was obvious to me that no one was going to coddle me and if I was struggling, it was primarily my job to figure out how to overcome it. As a pre-med major, I knew that my grades had to be flawless, but I struggled my first year having to adjust to being away from home and diving into a world of newfound freedom and independence. Going to my professor’s office hours helped me create a bond with them and they better understood my drive and long-term academic goals. This was beneficial in the long run because they wrote me beautiful letters of recommendation that helped me get into medical school right after I graduated. I enrolled in tutoring services and when the time came, I even became a tutor myself. Despite the noise about lack of resources at HBCU’s, I always felt like I had everything that I needed to excel.

 

On the personal side, my HBCU has truly made me the woman I am today. Being early, prepared, and confident were engrained into Spelman’s makeup and thus have stuck with me even after I graduated. Being exposed to the diverse history of Black people in my courses and having Black professors pour into me was an invaluable experience. My HBCU has given me lifelong friends, mentors, and an unspoken connection with any Spelman woman I encounter around the world.

What were some of your favorite memories of attending your HBCU?

Most of fondest memories took place at homecoming. HBCU homecoming is an entire experience in itself. There’s been an age long debate about which HBCU has the best homecoming, but of course I am biased and 100% sure it’s Spel-House. It’s not enough to tailgate and wait for the Morehouse football game, but there are R&B and Hip-Hop concerts, step shows, fashion exhibitions, and so much more to partake in. No matter how much stress I was under from my coursework, homecoming was the one time that I could push all of that to the side and enjoy my collegiate experience. My freshman year at Spelman, the AUC was so spoiled that we had the opportunity to see one of my favorite R&B artists perform, Jazmine Sullivan. I was in complete awe of her powerful voice and to see all of Spelman sisters filling up the chapel with the words to her songs, I felt like this was truly where I was meant to spend my next four years. 

What is any advice you would give to current students interested in attending an HBCU?

If I could give any advice to students interested in attending HBCU’s, it would be to first and foremost, reach out to current students. Admissions will give you the glitz and glam about the school, which isn’t wrong, but you should also be aware of the things that need improvement or may concern you. Talking to current students or alum can help you gain a better understanding of where you’ll be spending your next four years. Additionally, do not be afraid to inquire about scholarships. I was always told that “a closed mouth don’t get fed” and at an HBCU, scholarship money is scarce. Scholarships are not always merit based and it worth it for you to put yourself out there and decrease your debt early on. Lastly, be sure to research what your interests are before committing to the school. Many HBCUs don’t have trade programs (ex. architecture), so the major that you want may not be listed. This doesn’t mean that you can’t find a major that will lead you towards the same goal, but it is something to be aware of.

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2021 Top 20 HBCU's 

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